Judging Others Does Not Define Who They Are, It Defines Who You Are

Sarah Vine should take note!
 
If there is one characteristic I really do detest in a person, it’s narrow-minded judgement.
 
To have an opinion is one thing, it’s something to be expressed in an eloquent and respectful manner. We don’t all need to agree, debate is healthily and can prove advantageous for both sides.
But to scornfully judge and mock those who differ is wrong.
 
Sarah Vine has made her opinion on tattoos clear ‘Body art? No, tattoos are hideous self-harm’.
 
Tattoos have been around for thousands of years; some simple in design others so intricate in detail to call them anything other than art is ignorance of the talent and skills of the tattoo artist.
 

 
Each one tells a story, of love, death, survival over adversity, a ‘just because’ moment, of joyful times or a reminder of what was lost.
 
They are always personal.
 
I don’t necessarily like every tattoo style or placement out there, as with everything I have my own preferences. It’s not for me or anyone else to mock and ridicule the choices of others when they have no impact on me what so ever.
 
The former soldier whose dog tag tattoos pay tribute to his fallen comrades, probably doesn’t see his tattoo as self harm, but rather a tribute for those who never made it home.
 
The lady who adorns her mastectomy scars with colourful tattoo designs, sees it as a celebration of survival, not self harm.
 
The parent who adds a symbol, a phrase or a picture to remember a child loved and lost, doesn’t do it because they will forget otherwise, but rather it is their personal remembrance of someone gone too soon.
 
The bright colourful flash additions to many an individual should not be considered an embarrassment nor a rebellion {there are far cheaper and less painful ways to rebel} but a choice to make a permanent record of a moment in time.
 
A tattoo is a personal choice, a collaboration between an artist and the ‘canvas’, self harm it is not.
 
Self-harm is when somebody intentionally damages or injures their body. It is a way of coping with or expressing overwhelming emotional distress.’ NHS UK
 
Lets not trivialise something as serious as self harm, it’s a serious issue, and should be treated as such.

6 comments :

  1. I would have no problem with my kids getting tattoos but I have one piece of advice - 'Mum' and the name of your children are the ONLY names permissible
    We saw a couple of twenty-somethings the other day with the name of their pop group tattooed on their legs. I was assured the tattoos were the real McCoy and not temporary. Can't help feeling a trip to the removal parlour will be scheduled sometime in the future!
    Why is it self harm? Or is this woman dragging out the Old Testament and Jewish laws?

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  2. I'm sure there are plenty of people with tattoos who will one day want them removed or altered in some way, but at the time they got those tattoos, it's exactly what they wanted to do. I have one myself I'm currently re-designing, at the time it was 'right', now I want something different!

    Apparently it's self harm as women getting them is 'destroying' their 'greatest gift'...their appearance!

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  3. I've got one on my backside. I would like to state for the record and for the benefit of Ms Vine that I do not believe my arse is my greatest gift/asset! ;)

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    1. What?! How on earth can your bum not be your greatest asset? If it's tattooed it must be!

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  4. I wouldn't have tattoos myself and some I think are downright awful but the person chose to have them and so be it! Most tattoos suit the people - As you said, army ones, children's names etc, most are fitting x

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    1. There are 'interesting' ones out there, I could never ever in a month of blue Sundays get a tattoo on my face, but some folk like it! It really is depressing how quick some folk are to judge.x

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